Photo: Sunrise on the Spire – The Amazing Secret Coastline of Los Angeles

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This holiday week, if you’re in Southern California, think about how lucky you are with the weather.  And if you’re visiting, enjoy a visit to the coast!!

Title: Sunrise on the Spire I
Info: Nikon D7000, Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 with B+W 1.8 ND filter. ISO 100, 10 second exposure, f/11.
Photography: Ken Lee
Location: Los Angeles, California USA

Equipment:  Nikon D7000, Tokina AT-X 116

 

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Photo: On the Edge of Nirvana: Long Exposure Light Painting of a Forest Buddha!

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Title: On the Edge of Nirvana
Info: Nikon D7000, Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 lens. 30 second exposure, f/9, ISO 100. Light painted with an Energizer headlamp and blue electroluminescent wire. Very little Photoshop done here.
Photographer: Ken Lee
Location: deep in the forests of Los Angeles, CA USA.

Equipment:  Nikon D7000, Tokina AT-X 116

 

Photos: American Civil War Reenactment….in California!

True, there weren’t very many significant battles fought in California.  We didn’t have The Sacking of Sacramento, The Battle of Van Nuys, or the Massacre at Moorpark.

Although the Civil War Reenactment in Moorpark, California is the largest American Civil War Reenactment west of the Mississippi, the battle was a recreation of the South Mountain Battle in Maryland.  South Mountain is also known in several early Southern accounts as the Battle of Boonsboro Gap, September 14, 1862, as part of the Maryland Campaign of the American Civil War. This was the 150th Anniversary, and the reenactment took place in Moorpark, CA in what is the largest Civil War battle reenactment west of the Mississippi.

In fact, this event at Moorpark actually recreates five different battles over the course of two days.  And it has large camps, battle music, and much more, with much of the spectators also dressing in period clothing.

The reenactors did a great job in recreating the time period.  And as a photographer, I felt that I could enhance this even more through an antique paper and sloppy border appearance, giving it the feel of the 1860s in a way that color photos might not be able to achieve.

I checked out one of the Confederate cannons. Made in 1862, 150 years ago. As it turns out, this was actually made by the Union Army, but “acquired” by the Confederates in battle.

The battle photos were taken with a Nikon D90 and a Nikkor VR 18-200mm lens, while the up close cannon shot and the soldier smoking a cigar were taken with a Nikon D7000 and a Nikkor 50mm f/1.4, which is great for portraits and anything in which you want to have a narrow depth of field and highlight the subject.

If you want to learn more about how to achieve this antique paper and sloppy border appearance, click here for a tutorial.

And here are more photos from this Civil War Reenactment in Moorpark on my Virtual Photo Album.

Photo: The Amazing Wild Coast of….Los Angeles

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A beautiful warm day in late October. Lisa and I went to the most beautiful beach in Los Angeles.

These are long exposure photos. This one is a ten-second long exposure. The challenge to me is to try and keep the tripod still when the ocean water is ebbing and flowing, pulling on the tripod, pulling the soft wet sand away from the tripod and wrapping seaweed around the tripod legs! I always jam the tripod in as hard as possible, and this certainly helps, although of course not always!

And the other challenge is to try and keep the water from splashing on the lens or the camera. I destroyed my Nikon D90 at Bowling Ball Beach by having water splash on it, frying the circuit board.

Title: Sunset on the Secret Coast
Info: Nikon D7000, Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 with B+W 1.8 ND filter. ISO 100, 1.6 second exposure, f/11.
Photography: Ken Lee
Location: Los Angeles, California, USA.

Equipment:  Nikon D7000, Tokina AT-X 116

 

Photo: Comfortably Gnome (Light Painting/Long Exposure Photography)

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Gnomalicious!

Gnomes are fun!!  I dressed as a garden gnome for Halloween!  Here’s a photo of a gnome light painted deep, deep within the forests of Los Angeles here in California, using a variety of lights to create that magical, mystical aura.

Now I’ve got that feeling once again
I can’t explain you would not understand
This is not how I am.
IIIIIII-IIIIIII have become
Comfortably gnome.

Title: Astronomy Gnomine
Info: Nikon D7000, Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 lens. 30 second exposure, f/9, ISO 100.
Photographer: Ken Lee
Location: deep in the forest of Los Angeles, CA USA.

Equipment:  Nikon D7000, Tokina AT-X 116

 

Day of the Dead, Part Two! – iDia de los Muertos, Parte Dos!

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This was taken at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery during Dia de los Muertos on 27 October 2012.  You can see more photos from this on my Virtual Photo Album.  Act quickly, though, there’s only a few weeks until the end of the world!

If you are into photography and wish to know how to create this antique look with sloppy borders, it’s really not difficult.  Have a look at my blog to learn how.

When I process these photos, I feel like I never know what I am going to get until I am finished. Some photos take in an especially potent emotional quality when processed into a photo that looks like an antique. Others simply don’t work, and I’ll typically leave them off even if it is a good photo. But that said, often, it’s the portaits of people in face paint that work out best.

Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is about gathering families and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died. Although this usually corresponds with the Catholic holiday All Saints’ Day on November 1 and 2, Hollywood Forever held it beforehand. Traditions include building private altars honoring the deceased, using sugar skulls and the favorite foods, beverages, and affects of the departed.

Historians trace the origins to indigenous observances 2500-3000 years ago ago as well as to an Aztec festival dedicated to a goddess called Mictecacihuatl.

Equipment:  Nikon D7000, Tokina AT-X 116