How I got the photo: Owens Valley Radio Telescope Milky Way

Luck sometimes favors the prepared. I had put all my ducks in a row. I had contacted Cal Tech to obtain permission to photograph Owens Valley Radio Telescope near Bishop, CA. They had contacted security to let them know it was okay. But I couldn’t control the weather.

Fires and lightning storms

But it was about to be scuttled. To the south, the Sierras near Whitney Portal were on fire, creating tons of smoke and haze in the sky. To the east and the north, there was an enormous lightning storm over the White Mountains that were clouding the skies.
I set up my camera and tested it for exposure. I wanted my composition to look different from every other photo of these large dish telescopes. I wanted to create a fisheye photo of two telescopes, one in each corner. And I wanted the Milky Way to cut through the middle. Very specific, sure, but very possible. If the skies would cooperate.

Hungry gnats

And would I manage to survive? Hungry gnats buzzed aggressively at me. Although a hot summer day, I was already wearing boots, thick pants, a hoodie, and a cap to protect myself from the gnats, putting my hands under sleeves. But still they hungrily attacked.

Patience is a virtue

For long periods of time, nothing. Then I saw a clearing in the clouds ahead. It looked like it was coming my way. I triggered my intervalometer, setting it to take 20 photos in succession. I raced around and illuminated the two radio telescopes from an angle, being careful not to blow out the details and create some shadow for depth. Click! Click! Click! For between five and ten minutes, there was enough of an opening in the sky to make the Milky Way visible. And just as quickly, the skies closed

Details, details

To create this photo, I used a Nikon D750 with a Rokinon 12mm f/2.8 fisheye lens. I took 20 photos and “stacked” them later in Starry Landscape Stacker to reduce camera noise. Each of the 20 photos had an exposure of 15 seconds at f/2.8 with an ISO of 6400. July 2018.

VISIT ME, VISIT ME!

MY WEBSITE:
Head on over to the Ken Lee Photography website to purchase books or look at night photography and long exposure photos.  My latest book, “Abandoned Southern California: The Slowing of Time” is available there and Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Target, Booktopia, Books A Million, IBS, and Aladin. If you enjoy the book, please leave a nice review.

SOCIAL MEDIA:
Ken Lee Photography Facebook Page (poke your head in, say hi, and “like” the page if you would, uh, like)
Instagram

PODCAST:
Behind the Shot video podcast – interview February 2020

ARTICLES:
A Photographer Captures Haunting Nighttime Images of Abandoned Buildings, Planes, and Cars in the American Southwest – Business Insider by Erin McDowell
A Photographer Explores Southern California’s Desert Ruins – Los Angeles Magazine article by Chris Nichols

 

 

How to find the Milky Way

Short version

Northern Hemisphere: Wait until “Milky Way Season”, about April through October. Get away from light. Look south.
Southern Hemisphere: Wait until “Milky Way Season”, about April through October. Get away from light. Look high up.
Short and sweet. But should I end the article right here? Nahhhhh. Let’s keep moving!
“I see it! I see it!”

Longer version

When people talk about finding the Milky Way, they actual mean the galactic core of the Milky Way. Really, the Milky Way is visible throughout the year, whether we are in the Northern or Southern Hemisphere. After all, it’s our galaxy. It’s everywhere. But like everything else, we often speak this sort of “shorthand”.

Okay, fine, how can I see the galactic core of the Milky Way?

First, we need to find dark skies. The darker, the better. We need to get away from light pollution and even the moon. Oh, and clear skies helps too.

Milky Way Season

Night photographers often refer to the best time to view the galactic core as “Milky Way Season”. Most people prefer to photograph the galactic core because it’s denser, more complex, and has that “wow” factor.
In the Northern Hemisphere, “Milky Way Season” from about March or April to October. In the Southern Hemisphere, it’s flip-flopped, so it’s from about September to March. This is due to the way the earth spins on its axis, changing its angle the months go by.

What do I look for?

I was giving a night photography workshop several years ago. We were in some very clear dark skies in the Mojave Desert. After half an hour, one participant walked up and said, “I still don’t see the Milky Way. When will it come out?”
I replied, “It’s already out.”
“Oh really? I guess I don’t see it.”
I pointed, moving my hand back and forth around the Milky Way arcing overhead. “That’s the Milky Way right there.”
“Oh. My. Gosh. I thought those were CLOUDS!! That’s amazing! This is so exciting! This is the first time I’ve ever seen this! This is fantastic!” The person gave me a hug.
Yes, they can look like clouds. And yes, it is fantastic! And yes, it can provoke unadulterated joy.
In dark skies, the Milky Way appears like a hazy and, well, milky band arching across the night sky, in many parts too dense to make out individual stars.
In many photos, however, the Milky Way looks considerably more vivid than what we see with our own eyes. Why? Modern cameras are much more sensitive to dim starlight. Also, our eyes grow increasingly monochrome as light grows dimmer. Not so a camera. It can still “see” all the colors.

The galactic core

What people really want to see is the galactic core. This is the center of our galaxy. It looks denser and more complex, with more varying colors, because there is a greater concentration of stars as we look toward the middle of our galaxy. This has the most drama, and is what most night photographers seek to photograph.
In the Northern Hemisphere, the core is visible by looking Southeast or South, depending on what time of night. The core begins to be visible in the Southeast in March and April, South in July and August, and Southwest in September and October. During the course of the evening, if you are facing more or less south, it keeps drifting to the right due to the rotation of the earth.
In the Southern Hemisphere, the core is visible by also looking generally South, depending on what time of night. The core also begins to be visible in the Southeast in March and April, South and high up in the sky in July and August, and begins Southwest in September and October. However, it’s considerably higher in the sky than in the Northern Hemisphere.
In my opinion, given equally dark skies, the galactic core of the Milky Way is denser and more vivid in the Southern Hemisphere than what we see in the Northern Hemisphere. And due to the tilt of the earth, people there can also see more of the galactic core. Also, in the Southern Hemisphere, it is winter, often giving less humid skies and crisper stars.

Using apps

Apps can make things quite a bit easier. Using free or inexpensive  mobile apps such as Sky Guide, SkyView Lite or PhotoPills can make locating the Milky Way much easier. These can even show parts of the Milky Way that are still lower than the horizon and can show you where the Milky Way is going to move over time in the night sky. This can be useful for stargazing or planning one’s photos while incorporating the galactic core of the Milky Way. They can also show you if the moon is going to be out, and if so, when and where.

 

VISIT ME, VISIT ME!

MY WEBSITE:
Head on over to the Ken Lee Photography website to purchase books or look at night photography and long exposure photos.  My latest book, “Abandoned Southern California: The Slowing of Time” is available there and Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Target, Booktopia, Books A Million, IBS, and Aladin. If you enjoy the book, please leave a nice review.

SOCIAL MEDIA:
Ken Lee Photography Facebook Page (poke your head in, say hi, and “like” the page if you would, uh, like)
Instagram

PODCAST:
Behind the Shot video podcast – interview February 2020

ARTICLES:
A Photographer Captures Haunting Nighttime Images of Abandoned Buildings, Planes, and Cars in the American Southwest – Business Insider by Erin McDowell
A Photographer Explores Southern California’s Desert Ruins – Los Angeles Magazine article by Chris Nichols

 

 

How I got the photo: Ojo Oro Arch

I was instant messaging with a night photographer I had known mostly online for a few years when he extended the invitation: “It’s a secret area that only a few of us know. There’s no trails, and we have to hike out really far to some rocky arch formations and very dark skies. We are going to explore out there, take Milky Way photos of Ojo Oro Arch, and sleep overnight under the stars. Would you like to join my friend and I?”
What would you do? Right. Me too. No night photographer would say no.
We met in the middle of the Mojave Desert on a hot but gorgeous late afternoon, parked our cars, grabbed our gear, and began walking straight into the heart of nowhere. Bizarre otherworldly rock formations lay in front of us, drawing close as we walked approximately two miles to the hidden arch. We circled several times before finding it since they were trying to locate it by sight rather than GPS, coming across mysterious alcoves and still unnamed small arches. After a couple of minutes of this, I saw Ojo Oro Arch from the back, seeing the blue sky through the arch.

The desert as philosopher

We set down our gear, sleeping bags, and gallons of water and roamed about, exploring as the sun melted into the mountains. We ate, talked about night photography, gear, life, teaching, the coronavirus, sheltering in place, women, constellations, our place in the universe, philosophy, religion, and more. Night photography in the quiet evening desert has a way of drawing out discussions that are increasingly esoteric, after all.
We drank copious amounts of water. I had brought over a gallon and a half for this overnight outing, and I was going to make sure I didn’t carry very much of it on the long walk back to the car.

The mysterious hum of the magic desert

As we rested, the silence of the desert overwhelmed me. Two miles from the closest road, we heard nothing human-made. No cars, no airplanes, nothing. And often, there was no breeze, either. Silence. Or not quite. There’s a certain sort of hum that one can hear when there’s absolute silence, and at times, when there were no whispering of the breeze through the cactus, there was that hum. It was majestic. I found myself smiling.

Setting up the camera

We had already set up our cameras and taken “blue hour” photos of the arch in case we wished to blend them with the Milky Way photos later in post-processing. After 11 pm, we knew that the Milky Way would begin rising out of the Southeast. We knew this from experience, although we used apps such as PhotoPills or SkyView Lite to look anyway.
I often will do a low-ISO photo of the foreground so I have less noise. For this evening, I determined that I would be photographing with a 15 second exposure at f/2.5 using a relatively high ISO of 4000. Because of this, I could determine the settings that would give me the equivalent exposure but at a much lower, less noisy ISO. I chose ISO 400. This is ten times less sensitive than ISO 4000.  Therefore, I would need to increase the exposure by ten times to compensate. I like simple math. I would keep the aperture constant, so that didn’t need to be adjusted. So therefore, my low-noise foreground setting would be 150 second exposure at f/2.5 at ISO 400. Not only would this reduce the noise, but it would also give me 150 seconds to do the “light painting”!

Illuminating the arch for the photo

I began “light painting” the arch, walking around with a handheld ProtoMachines LED2 light painting device, illuminating the arch as I went. I prefer to use a handheld device instead of stationary light panels to illuminate foregrounds because I can “light paint” from many angles quickly, and if I wish, also change colors quickly.

Photographing the Milky Way

After creating the low-noise foreground photo, I adjusted my camera settings to 15 seconds at f/2.5 ISO 4000, and keeping my camera in the same place, began clicking off successive 15 second photos, one right after the other. Although I most certainly could use one of these, having numerous photos gives me options, including the ability to “stack” them together using Starry Landscape Stacker to reduce the noise and bring out more of the stars.

Wash, rinse, repeat

I mostly did several similar setups with my camera, photographing the same arch from different angles. First the low-noise foreground photo, then the higher-ISO photos for the sky. I did do some star trails photos as well.
I stopped photographing at 3:30 in the morning. I made one last check for scorpions by shining a bIack light around me, looking to see any glowing scorpions. Thankfully, none. I lay in my sleeping bag looking up at the sky. The Milky Way arched directly overhead. Again, that magical hum of complete desert silence. I found myself smiling.

VISIT ME, VISIT ME!

MY WEBSITE:
Head on over to the Ken Lee Photography website to purchase books or look at night photography and long exposure photos.  My latest book, “Abandoned Southern California: The Slowing of Time” is available there and Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Target, Booktopia, Books A Million, IBS, and Aladin. If you enjoy the book, please leave a nice review.

SOCIAL MEDIA:
Ken Lee Photography Facebook Page (poke your head in, say hi, and “like” the page if you would, uh, like)
Instagram

PODCAST:
Behind the Shot video podcast – interview February 2020

ARTICLES:
A Photographer Captures Haunting Nighttime Images of Abandoned Buildings, Planes, and Cars in the American Southwest – Business Insider by Erin McDowell
A Photographer Explores Southern California’s Desert Ruins – Los Angeles Magazine article by Chris Nichols

 

 

How I Pack For Night Photography

How you pack and organize your belongings directly impacts your experience. This is true of all forms of photography, but perhaps especially night photography. After all, you will need to access your belongings repeatedly in the dark. I am going to describe how I am currently packing for my night photography trips. And probably like you, this will change over time. Even if you don’t do night photography, you might find much of this useful as general organizing and packing tips.

 

The camera backpack I use for hiking and traveling when photographing at night

 

There’s no such thing as a perfect camera bag, of course. But so far, I’m loving this Tenba Solstice 20L bag. It’s comfortable even despite the weight, has sufficient padding to protect the gear well, and is logically laid out. It also stands up easily on its own, as the bag, like many Tenba bags, holds its own shape due to the padding. It’s also water-resistant and even has a waterproof bag inside the top compartment, should you need to use it. As a bonus, it doesn’t scream “I am a camera bag” to others, although it does look like an extra nice backpack, something the average person might not use for muddy socks and underwear.

It also has deep side pockets for drinks or other gear. Most of the places that I photograph are in the desert, so it’s good to have lots of drinks. I can easily fit two 32-ounce drink bottles on my backpack, one in each side pocket. I usually keep drinks in the side pouches because if there’s a leak, it won’t leak into my gear. If I only need one bottle, I will sometimes keep a roll of orange gaffer’s tape in one of the side pockets.

 

Back access to the camera bag

 

I prefer to have a camera backpack that opens from the rear. This is so if it is muddy, I can access all my gear without taking off the backpack. If my waist strap is on, I simply take off the shoulder straps and turn the backpack around so it is facing me and then access everything from the back without having to take the backpack off and put it on muddy ground.

 

With the back open, you can see that I have two cameras. On the left is the rather large and heavy Pentax K-1 with an attached Pentax 15-30mm f/2.8 lens. On the right is a Nikon D750 with a Rokinon 12mm f/2.8 lens. Above the cameras is a large microfiber cloth, and to the right of that, two Vello Shutterboss II intervalometers. One of them is for the Pentax since its connector differs from Nikon connectors. To differentiate, I have this labeled with orange tape that says “Kentax” (see what I did there?). Above the cloth and intervalometers is a thin yellow bag. That is a small emergency first aid kit. And above that is a Think Tank pouch with chargers and random things.

 

What goes on the top compartment?

 

This is a view of the bag looking down. I have removed the gray Think Tank bag for this photo. The idea of the Think Tank bag is that I keep all my belongings that I ordinarily don’t need out in the field, such as battery chargers, USB cables and various other accessories. I leave these in the car or in the motel room.

After I remove the gray Think Tank bag from the camera backpack, I have lots of room. Right now, I have the yellow first aid kit, a Nikon body cap, and an extra LensPen. This hardly takes up any space. What I usually place in here when I am about to photograph are things like snacks and an extra shirt or jacket and a beanie.

Sometimes I put a roll of orange gaffer’s tape inside as well. Gaffer’s tape makes everything right. You can tape down the focus ring of your lens, tape cables to keep them out of the way, keep a broken battery door from flapping open, or a thousand other uses. It’s the secret weapon in your night photography bag, the tool that makes everything alright.
Inside the zipped pouch you can see a yellow Allen wrench, a spare remote shutter cable release, and a small microfiber cloth. You can never have too many microfiber cloths. I keep these here because I may need to access this in the field, but it’s not something I really need unless something on the tripod loosens or some other emergency.

Exterior pouch to keep things easily accessible

I like to keep my light painting equipment easily accessible. This is a pouch that I purchased at an Army/Navy surplus store. Inside I store the ProtoMachines LED2 light painting device that I use for almost every night photography outing. The ProtoMachines is a high-end handheld light painting device that is capable of producing all colors of the RGB spectrum, also giving you full control over saturation and brightness. It also allows you to store eight presets and has a timer. I use the timer sometimes, although I do still count to myself when doing light painting. But most importantly, it has the most beautiful light for light painting I have ever seen.

I also have pepper spray inside this pouch, which I keep for protection. I’ve never had to use the pepper spray, and hope I never will. I sometimes remove the holster from the backpack and wear it on my belt if I am not going to have the entire backpack with me for evening easier access.

 

What is all the tape for?

The white tape is glow-in-the-dark tape, while the orange tape is just some horrible looking gaffer’s tape that I should remove but have not. This is the light painting device of a working night photographer. It ain’t pretty, but it’s functional and harder to lose in the dark.

 

Storing small things conveniently in the front compartments

Finally, a view of the front compartment of the Tenba bag. Here, I keep a plastic cover for the camera if it begins sprinkling or if I am doing photos near a waterfall or the ocean. Salt water and electronics do not mix. You can see the white string of this bag peaking out on top.

 

Lots of batteries

Below that, you can just barely see some orange battery holders. I use these for storing extra batteries for the ProtoMachines and the intervalometers. Easy access. And in the innermost pocket at the bottom of the photo, you can see several battery organizers, one for the Pentax K-1, the other for the Nikon D750. I like having lots of extra batteries because you never know how many batteries you are going to plow through on a cold night. Better safe than sorry. I prefer these battery organizers because it keeps everything neat and accessible, but also because the contacts of the batteries never meet. Also inside is an SD card holder, which you can barely see…you can see the thin yellow stripe.

 

Where does the tripod go?

When I am doing night photography, I usually carry a 26″ Feisol carbon fiber tripod. If I wanted to, I could attach this tripod to the side pocket and strap it in or use straps and strap it to the front of the backpack. However, in practice, I don’t do this unless I am hiking relatively far. If there is one weakness of the Tenba Solstice 20L, it’s that it is not the best backpack I’ve had for attaching large tripods. Then again, many people don’t have a tripod larger than 26″. Regardless, I can carry all the equipment you see here and still be able to slide it underneath the seat of an airplane. I’ll live with the trade-off.

 

Finding your way in the dark

I keep everything in a specific place, and can find everything even when it is completely dark outside. If I don’t want to blow out my vision because it is dark and I am trying to photograph Milky Ways, I can still access my belongings without turning on my headlamp.

I hope this gives you some ideas. How do you pack for night photography? What would you do? Feel free to start a conversation below in the comments section. Thanks for reading.

-Ken

 

VISIT ME, VISIT ME!

MY WEBSITE:
Head on over to the Ken Lee Photography website to purchase books or look at night photography and long exposure photos.  My latest book, “Abandoned Southern California: The Slowing of Time” is available there and Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Target, Booktopia, Books A Million, IBS, and Aladin. If you enjoy the book, please leave a nice review.

SOCIAL MEDIA:
Ken Lee Photography Facebook Page (poke your head in, say hi, and “like” the page if you would, uh, like)
Instagram

PODCAST:
Behind the Shot video podcast – interview February 2020

ARTICLES:
A Photographer Captures Haunting Nighttime Images of Abandoned Buildings, Planes, and Cars in the American Southwest – Business Insider by Erin McDowell
A Photographer Explores Southern Caoifornia’s Desert Ruins – Los Angeles Magazine article by Chris Nichols

BOOK AUTHOR EVENT MARCH 22 2020:
And hopefully I will see you March 22nd 2020 at 5 pm Valley Relics Museum for a brief slide show and presentation for my new book “Abandoned Southern California: The Slowing of Time”.  Get there early to check out the museum.
Address: 7900 Balboa Blvd. C3 & C4 Entrance on, Stagg St, Van Nuys, CA 91406

 

 

Interview On “Behind The Shot” video podcast!

I AM INTERVIEWED ON A PODCAST ABOUT THE COVER PHOTO FOR MY NEW BOOK:
Please join me on the latest episode of the Behind the Shot podcast as I sit down with Steve Brazill to take a look at how I created the image that graces the cover of my new book “Abandoned Southern California: The Slowing of Time”. There is a video podcast, but you can also download an audio podcast as well. Either way, it promises to be good fun. Watch, listen, and subscribe here: https://behindtheshot.tv/2020/02/13/capturing-the-slowing-of-time/
LOS ANGELES MAGAZINE RAN A SHORT STORY ABOUT MY NEW BOOK:

https://www.lamag.com/article/abandoned-southern-california/


BOOK AUTHOR EVENT MARCH 22 2020:
And hopefully I will see you March 22nd at 5 pm Valley Relics Museum for a brief slide show and presentation. Get there early to check out the museum.
Address: 7900 Balboa Blvd. C3 & C4 Entrance on, Stagg St, Van Nuys, CA 91406

VISIT ME, VISIT ME!

MY WEBSITE:
Head on over to the Ken Lee Photography website to purchase books or look at night photography and long exposure photos.  My latest book, “Abandoned Southern California: The Slowing of Time” is available there and Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Target, Booktopia, Books A Million, IBS, and Aladin. If you enjoy the book, please leave a nice review.

SOCIAL MEDIA:
Ken Lee Photography Facebook Page (poke your head in, say hi, and “like” the page if you would, uh, like)
Instagram

PODCAST:
Behind the Shot video podcast – interview February 2020

ARTICLES:
A Photographer Captures Haunting Nighttime Images of Abandoned Buildings, Planes, and Cars in the American Southwest – Business Insider by Erin McDowell
A Photographer Explores Southern Caoifornia’s Desert Ruins – Los Angeles Magazine article by Chris Nichols

Molino De Viento De Las Estrellas-Joshua Tree National Park Under The Starry Skies!

Molino De Viento De Las Estrellas (7633)


Joshua Tree National Park, CA is my spiritual home for night photography, so every summer, I try to visit at least once to photograph the Milky Way. I used a Pinout remote controller/app to set and trigger the camera. You totally can share this using the FB share button.
~~
Esta foto es de anoche, una noche hermosa en el desierto. Un viejo molino de viento abandonado en Joshua Tree National Park en California.
~~
Nikon D610/Irix 15mm f/2.4 lens @ 15 seconds f/2.4 ISO 5000 on 2017-07-25.
~~
IG – @kenleephotography
fb – kenleephotography
500px – kenleephotography
~~
#kenlee #kenleephotography #slowshutter #amazing_longexpo #longexphunter #longexpoelite #longexposure_shots #nightscaper #supreme_nightshots #ig_astrophotography #super_photolongexpo #long_exposure #nightscaper #nightphotography #longexposure #milkyway #joshuatree #joshuatreenationalpark #findyourpark #jtnp

Long Exposure Night Photo with Light Painting

VISIT ME, VISIT ME!
You can see more of these photos here  on my Ken Lee Photography Facebook Page (poke your head in, say hi, and “like” the page if you would, uh, like), on 500px, or my Ken Lee Google+ Page. We discuss long exposure, night sky, star trails, and coastal long exposure photography, as well as lots of other things, so I hope you can join us!

And you can go to the Ken Lee Photography website, which has more photos from Ken Lee.  Thank you very much for visiting!

 

Soledad – Joshua Tree National Park At Night – Milky Way

Soledad (7722)


I thought I’d share a photo from last night, a beautiful desert night. Several of us from Southern California stuffed ourselves with pizza at Pie For The People and then photographed the Milky Way in Joshua Tree National Park, CA until about 4 am. By that time, I was famished again. I went through Casteñeda’s drive-through on the way back. Why am I still so skinny?

I illuminated the lonely, interestingly-shaped Joshua Tree with a hand-held ProtoMachines LED2 flashlight while the shutter was open on my tripod-mounted camera. I used a Pinout remote controller/app to set and trigger the camera. And here, we’re giving the oft-neglected northern part of the Milky Way some love. You totally can share this using the FB share button.
~~
Esta foto es de anoche, una noche hermosa en el desierto. Un grupo de nosotros del sur de California comimos pizza y fotografiamos la Vía Láctea. Iluminé el árbol con una ProtoMachines LED2 linterna mientras el obturador de la cámara estaba abierto.
~~
Nikon D610/Irix 15mm f/2.4 lens @ 15 seconds f/2.4 ISO 5000 on 2017-07-26.
~~
IG – @kenleephotography
fb – kenleephotography
500px – kenleephotography
~~
#kenlee #kenleephotography #slowshutter #amazing_longexpo #longexphunter #longexpoelite #longexposure_shots #nightscaper #supreme_nightshots #ig_astrophotography #super_photolongexpo #‎long_exposure‬ #nightscaper #nightphotography #longexposure #milkyway #joshuatree #joshuatreenationalpark #findyourpark #jtnp #vialactea #largaexposicion #fotografianocturna #nikon #irix #pinout

Long Exposure Night Photo with Light Painting

VISIT ME, VISIT ME!
You can see more of these photos here  on my Ken Lee Photography Facebook Page (poke your head in, say hi, and “like” the page if you would, uh, like), on 500px, or my Ken Lee Google+ Page. We discuss long exposure, night sky, star trails, and coastal long exposure photography, as well as lots of other things, so I hope you can join us!

And you can go to the Ken Lee Photography website, which has more photos from Ken Lee.  Thank you very much for visiting!

 

Photo: A Bowl Of Milk (Milky Way in the Owens Valley)

A Bowl of Milk (7203)


This is Owens Valley Radio Observatory in the Owens Valley, CA, listening to the Milky Way. I photographed this coming back from the Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest. To my surprise, I was immediately swarmed by aggressive mosquitos during the entire shoot despite wearing wearing a hat and a hoodie. I got quite a few bites on my hands and even my forehead despite wearing a knit cap.

I used a Pinout remote controller/app to set and trigger the camera.

Nikon D610/Irix 15mm f/2.4 lens @ 20 seconds f/2.4 ISO 4000 on 2017-06-23 01:23.

IG-@kenleephotography
fb – kenleephotography
500px – kenleephotography

#kenlee #kenleephotography #slowshutter #amazing_longexpo #longexphunter #longexpoelite #longexposure_shots #nightscaper #supreme_nightshots #ig_astrophotography #super_photolongexpo #long_exposure #nightscaper #nightphotography #longexposure #owensvalley #ovro #thebigears

 Long Exposure Night Photo with Light Painting

VISIT ME, VISIT ME!
You can see more of these photos here  on my Ken Lee Photography Facebook Page (poke your head in, say hi, and “like” the page if you would, uh, like), on 500px, or my Ken Lee Google+ Page. We discuss long exposure, night sky, star trails, and coastal long exposure photography, as well as lots of other things, so I hope you can join us!

And you can go to the Ken Lee Photography website, which has more photos from Ken Lee.  Thank you very much for visiting!

 

Photo: Luxury by the Lakeside – Abandoned RV Under The Milky Way

Luxury By The Lakeside (7329)


Someone’s former home near Owens Lake in California, a lake that was fairly large before the DWP and the L.A. Aqueduct sucked it dry. Now it’s common to have enormous dust clouds blowing from the lake. But back in the 1870s, steamer ships cruised across the lake, where silver mined from Cerro Gordo was loaded on to the ships to transport across the lake, part of the trip south to Los Angeles.

I illuminated interior and exterior with a hand-held ProtoMachines LED2 flashlight while the shutter was open on my tripod-mounted camera. Originally, I was going for a 15 second exposure. I never could get all the “light painting” finished. I made it 16 seconds. That I could do. I can only run so fast. I used a Pinout remote controller/app to set and trigger the camera.

Nikon D610/Irix 15mm f/2.4 lens @ 16 seconds f/2.4 ISO 5000 on 2017-06-24 00:44.

IG-@kenleephotography
fb – kenleephotography
500px – kenleephotography

#kenlee #kenleephotography #slowshutter #amazing_longexpo #longexphunter #longexpoelite #longexposure_shots #nightscaper #supreme_nightshots #ig_astrophotography #super_photolongexpo #long_exposure #nightscaper #nightphotography #longexposure #owensvalley #milkyway #owenslake #camper

Long Exposure Night Photo with Light Painting

VISIT ME, VISIT ME!
You can see more of these photos here  on my Ken Lee Photography Facebook Page (poke your head in, say hi, and “like” the page if you would, uh, like), on 500px, or my Ken Lee Google+ Page. We discuss long exposure, night sky, star trails, and coastal long exposure photography, as well as lots of other things, so I hope you can join us!

And you can go to the Ken Lee Photography website, which has more photos from Ken Lee.  Thank you very much for visiting!

 

Photo: Remembering – More Relevant Than Ever (Manzanar Milky Way)!

Remembering (7025)


The “Soul Consoling Tower” at the Manzanar cemetery. 120,313 Japanese-Americans were forcibly removed to one of ten concentration camps during WWII. Manzanar in Owens Valley, CA, was one of these sites.

Photographed this near the new moon at night with Ron Pinkerton. I illuminated the tower with a hand-held ProtoMachines LED2 flashlight while the shutter was open on my tripod-mounted camera. I used a Pinout remote controller/app to set and trigger the camera.

Nikon D610/Irix 15mm f/2.4 lens @ 20 seconds f/2.4 ISO 4000 on 2017-06-21 22:02.

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Long Exposure Night Photo with Light Painting

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