Trona Glow Star Trails: Trona Pinnacles, Mojave Desert, California

startrails-tronapinnacles3-50min-30sf28iso400

Please click on the photo to view it larger and more clearly!  Thanks!

A heavenly nocturnal show of the movement of the stars, moving around the North Star, with the glow of the little town of Trona below. I had the Trona Pinnacles to myself for the entire night, the desert air silent except for the occasional train rumbling past. It was a very peaceful evening, both here and later photographing the “Kill Bill” Church in Antelope Valley, elsewhere in the vast Mojave Desert.

The glow in the distance is from the little town of Trona.  I don’t always put glows in my night sky photos from neighboring towns, often trying to avoid light pollution altogether.  But this was so beautiful looking I had to incorporate it into this 51 minute star trails long exposure photo.  The pinnacles, left from when this was a lake, were illuminated by the moonlight.

I mostly enjoyed the peacefulness, although I did at one point lay on my car watching the stars while playing Bob Marley and Brian Eno/Cluster.  I later went to photograph the “Kill Bill” Church, made famous by Quentin Tarantino.  You’ll see that next week.

~~~

Title: Trona Glow Star Trails
Photographer: Ken Lee
Info: Nikon D7000 with Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 lens, 51 minute total exposure that was stacked in PS4. Each individual photo was a 30 second exposure, f/2.8, ISO 400. 18 July 2013 begun at 12:28 am. The pinnacles are illuminated with moonlight.
Location: Trona Pinnacles, California, USA

Equipment:  Nikon D7000, Tokina AT-X 116, Feisol tripod.

VISIT ME, VISIT ME!
You can see more of these photos here  on my Ken Lee Photography Facebook Page (poke your head in, say hi, and “like” the page if you would, uh, like). We discuss long exposure, night sky, star trails, and coastal long exposure photography, as well as lots of other things, so I hope you can join us!

And you can go to the Ken Lee Photography website, which has more photos from Ken Lee.  Thank you very much for visiting!

 

Advertisements

Star Trails Over Quail Springs, Joshua Tree – Long Exposure Time Lapse Photography

When I’m shooting north-facing photos, I really love to place Polaris as interestingly as I can in the frame. Here, I’ve managed to place it at the pinnacle of the cliff to accentuate the trails and draw the eye to the pinnacle more.

startrails-quailsprings30sf28iso250-50min-700px

Please click on the photo to view it larger and more clearly!  Thanks!

This whole scene was lit by a full moon, with no light painting of any kind.  The light of the full moon was so bright that I think I may have been able to read a book!!

I hope you enjoy the photo, and thank you for stopping in!

Title: Quail Springs Rocks Star Trails
Info: Nikon D7000, Tokina f/2.8 11-16mm. Stacked photo consisting of 99 individual photos of 30 second exposure f/2.8 ISO 250 each, taken 11:20 am 25 May 2013. 49 and a half minutes total exposure. Lit by moonlight only.
Photographer: Ken Lee
Location: Joshua Tree National Park, CA
USAThank you so much for your love and encouragement! -Ken

Equipment:  Nikon D7000, Tokina AT-X 116, Feisol tripod.

VISIT ME, VISIT ME!
You can see more of these photos here  on my Ken Lee Photography Facebook Page (poke your head in, say hi, and “like” the page if you would, uh, like). We discuss long exposure, night sky, star trails, and coastal long exposure photography, as well as lots of other things, so I hope you can join us!

And you can go to the Ken Lee Photography website, which has more photos from Ken Lee.  Thank you very much for visiting!

 

Featured Quote: Michael Kenna on the Act of Photography Connecting Us To the World

Joshua Tree Star Trails (Ken Lee, night photographer)

Joshua Tree Star Trails.  This is a photo that I (Ken) took in the middle of a warm summer night.  I brought out one of those zero-gravity loungers and looked up at the sky during the entire exposure.  Indeed, as Michael Kenna describes in his quote below, the act of photography does connect us to the world. NIkon D90, 18-200mm VR lens, MC-DC2 remote release cord, and my father’s 1970s Sears metal tripod.

I love this quote and thought I’d share with you.

“Getting photographs is not the most important thing. For me it’s the act of photographing. It’s enlightening, therapeutic and satisfying, because the very process forces me to connect with the world. When you make four-hour exposures in the middle of the night, you inevitably slow down and begin to observe and appreciate more what’s going on around you. In our fast-paced, modern world, it’s a luxury to be able to watch the stars move across the sky.” – Michael Kenna in “Photographer’s Forum Interview” – Winter 2003 by Claire Sykes